Covid-19 / Design Community / Graduates / Graphic Design

Graduates – where to go for career support

Since graduation day, I’ve noticed that there seems to be a huge surge of posts and advice on social media for new graduates from people in the design industry – much more so than previous years. Perhaps the whole Covid thing has a lot to do with it – after all, those in education have really had it hard over the past 18 months.

Graduates, in particular, have had such a lot to deal with, not just having their place of education shut down for months on end, but having to adjust to home learning, and facing exams and assessments with little or no peer support. It’s had a huge impact on mental health, and so those now transitioning from education to finding their place on the career ladder are surely finding it so much more stressful than previous graduates.

You might remember that I recently wrote about how we, as designers, can help and support young people who are just starting their design careers. Now, I’d like to spin that around, and see what information is out there for newly-graduated people who are looking at career options.

My first observation is that LinkedIn seems to have a lot of posts by designers urging new graduates to remain positive, and not give up when looking for placements or work. They recognise that things are tough for everyone at the moment, and are more than willing to offer words of encouragement to those just starting out. And beyond that, I’ve seen a lot of useful advice and links to articles and companies to get young people started in their careers.

I think that LinkedIn is probably a really good place for new graduates to look at, since most design agencies have a presence and are willing to hear from graduates seeking advice and work. If you can establish a strong profile on LinkedIn and use it to connect with the kinds of businesses and agencies you want to work with, placing examples of your best work on there, it can be a great starting place and will get you recognised.

Notable advice from around the web

I had a look around the web, and a few things stood out that I thought were worth a mention (how I wish the internet were around when I was graduating first time around).

This article on Creative Boom gives some sound advice – and I totally agree with the sentiment that you should always personalise your correspondence. We’ve become used to ‘blanket emails’, in which we basically copy-and-paste our requests to several businesses in the hope that we get some kind of response. But this isn’t the best way to do it – yes, you might think it saves a lot of time and effort when you’re faced with writing to 20, 50, 100 people, but if you can focus your efforts by targeting only those agencies or businesses that you are truly keen to work with, learn all you can about them, and then write a personalised email, then you’ll find that you’ll get a much more positive response, because your message will stand out as being clearly written solely for that person, rather than the copy-and-paste message that they undoubtedly get loads of.

Something else that stood out for me in this article is the point of creating and showing only the kind of designs that apply to the kind of agency you want to work for. The example they give is; “If your style looks like Adidas, it’s unlikely to get you a job at Harrods”. That’s a point well made – when you are approaching agencies with a view to working with them, take a good look at the kind of thing they work on, and think about how it fits in with the kind of design you want to do. For example, if you are really passionate about designing packaging for corporates, you don’t want to be sending pieces to agencies that focus on branding or web design. They simply won’t be interested.

I recently read this article that made a good point about being resilient, which I think is something that few of us are prepared for when we first graduate. The fact is, many of us when we leave the safety of education and move into the workplace, are unprepared for it. It can be a bit of a shock to the system when you’re used to working on projects for your own enjoyment, and find that you have to comply with other people’s ideas of what design should be. You’ll likely have no experience of working with clients or employers, who will often dictate what you will work on and the styles and methods they expect you to use.

There will be agencies who you apply to who simply will not be on board with your particular styles and ideas – and that’s fine. Learn to accept their views and move on. The right job is out there, somewhere, and it might mean that you have to take less than desirable jobs in order to get the experience needed to get where you want to be.

Seeking support

From my own experience, one piece of advice I’d give is not to be alone. These days, there is such a lot of help, advice, and support out there – take it. Taking that next step can be exhilarating, exciting, and also anxiety-inducing, scary, and sometimes soul-destroying. We’ve all been there – and we’ve all come through it (mostly) unscathed.

Seek out other graduates on social media, who you can talk to about your successes and failures – keep in touch with those who were on your course, and seek out those who were not. Make connections with people who have been through it and have made successful careers, and ask them how they did it. When things are good, share your stories. When things are bad, reach out to someone who can give you a fresh perspective and urge you on.

Don’t be afraid to change your mind

I can’t begin to tell you how many times I’ve changed things in my career. You might begin a placement that simply isn’t right for you. Or maybe you’ll change your views on the kind of designer you want to be. Just know that that’s always ok. There is always space to change direction. We are creatives, and it’s important that we evolve, even if that means changing what we do and trying things that are totally out of our comfort zone.

The career you think you want right now might be completely different from where you find yourself in ten years’ time. Don’t be afraid of that.

Article / Design Community / Design Strategy / Experience / Graduates / Graphic Design

How can we avoid the ‘feast and famine’ cycle?

Can you relate – you find that you’re really busy and run off your feet for a few weeks, and then…nothing. It happens to us all, doesn’t it? And in the current climate, I think it’s been highlighted more than ever.

The trouble is, when you run your own business, there is going to be an element of ‘feast and famine’ sometimes, because when we’re busy with projects, we naturally have less time to complete our marketing tasks (eg. LinkedIn posts…). These things get pushed to the back of the queue while we put our everything into getting the work done.

But then, when those projects are done, there’s nothing to replace it. Your social media has been dormant for weeks, you haven’t sent out any emails or spoken to any prospects – you’ve fallen off the radar.

So, what can we do to avoid that? It’s a question that’s certainly been on my own mind lately – and I know that plenty of other business-owners feel the same.

Make a plan

Design work is rarely filled with ongoing projects – once you’ve completed the project, the client pays you and they’re gone.

Although you can nurture those clients so that they come back to you for other projects, what you really need to be doing is making a solid plan for how you’re going to market your services on an ongoing basis. This is an important step in avoiding those lulls in work, because without a marketing plan, you continue to be stuck in that trap.

Did I say ‘a plan’? I meant two – let me explain why…

We’ve already established that as designers, we’re either busy with projects, or we’re not. So in order to ensure that those quiet times are fewer, we need a two modes of marketing – one for when we’re busy, and one for when we’re not.

I’ll talk about the quiet periods first – because I’m guessing if you’re reading this, then that’s the space you’re in right now.

Whatever you normally do to market your business – triple it. If you’re consistently finding yourself with period of little or no work, then it’s purely because you’re not doing enough marketing. So:

  • If you normally post to your social channels once a day, start posting 3 or 4 times a day.
  • If you usually send out 10 emails, send 30.
  • If you have been making a couple of cold calls, give yourself an hour and make as many as you can for the next week.

Look at other ways of marketing yourself, such as:

  • Create a newsletter and gather a list of potential clients.
  • Go back to past clients to see if they need anything designing for their marketing/websites.
  • Invest in some side projects; I created a book showcasing my design story. You could try creating some ‘mock’ projects for companies you admire and dream of working with.

OK, so that seems like a lot of effort, but remember that it is only temporary. If you can commit to your enhanced marketing plan, and do it every day for the next 2 months (or however long it takes), you should start to see things pick up again. After that, you can fall back on your second marketing plan…

How to market your services when you’re super-busy

We all do it – when we’re busy working on design projects, they take over and marketing becomes an afterthought. But that’s the problem, isn’t it? Where do we find the time to do marketing tasks when we’re so involved in big web-design projects, when we’re filling our days talking with clients, sorting out branding, liaising with contractors and knee-deep in image sourcing?

Even in those busy times, it’s important to keep up with marketing – but there are things you can do to make doing that much easier and less time-consuming.

Set aside some time

If you can squeeze in even one hour every week, commit to that. Don’t just think it – write it down. Put it in your diary, and block that time out to do your marketing.

Got a spare 10 minutes? Log onto your social media and post something useful. Like and comment on a few posts. These things only take a moment.

Make sure past clients remember you

Make it a habit to add clients to your social media lists. That way, when you do post, you’ll remain visible for next time they need you.

It’s a good idea to create some sort of newsletter or regular email, so that you can easily keep in touch with past clients, too. There are several online tools that will do this for you, such as Mailchimp and Constant Contact.

Automate what you can

There are a few things you can automate for when you’re short on time. Probably the most useful is social media posting – using a tool like Buffer or Hootsuite, you can just spend half and hour writing all your posts for the week ahead, and then pretty much forget about it.

You can also schedule things like your blog posts and newsletters, by batch writing them and then setting a scheduled date for when you want them to go out. If you can do this during your quiet times, then you can potentially have the weeks or months ahead sorted for when you do get busy.

Consistency is key

Having a consistent plan will help you to look more professional in front of your audience, and make sure that you have a steadier income, rather than struggling with periods of ‘drought’ in your business.

Writing down your regular marketing tasks can make sure that you stay on track, and you can then keep tabs on what’s working and what isn’t, so that you can tweak things as you need to.

I hope this helps. Getting stuck in the ‘feast and famine’ cycle isn’t fun for any business – and I’m saying that from a place of experience. But as I hope I’ve demonstrated, there are simple things you can do to help you get through it.

Article / Design Community / Education / Experience / Graduates / Graphic Design

The stuff they don’t teach you at art school

OK, so it’s been a little while since my first time as a design grad. Those days where I had a little less stress, a little less knowledge… but how does my experience compare with that of todays graduates? Do we face the same problems and the same worries?

I’d guess that very little has changed, despite the huge advancement in the technology we use, because the way that we are taught is fundamentally the same. Like with everything, I suppose, the education system moves much more slowly than the real world does.

I’m bringing this up because of a conversation with one of my tutors, Alec Dudson, who has a real issue with the fact that even modern design courses fail to teach the basics of business education. When students leave education and begin searching for work or internships, they often have no idea what to expect, or what is expected of them. That can be really tough – and in some cases put a dampener on a new designer’s self-confidence.

This is written from a graphic design perspective, although I suppose it could equally apply to other creative industries too. Perhaps by sharing my own insights, I can give you some idea of what the transition from education to working for a design agency can be like, from my own experiences and some other creatives I’ve spoken to.

Getting the right internship

Internships, to me, seem relatively new – they were practically unheard of in the UK when I first graduated, and didn’t become the norm until much more recently. It’s pretty rare to find a good internship with smaller agencies, especially outside major cities, and this has advantages and disadvantages, depending on the direction you want to take as a designer.

On the plus side, if you can get in with a design agency which is well-known, then it gives your CV a bit of clout, and can get you noticed further down the line if you choose to look for localised agency work, or even if you go the freelance route.

But working with a larger agency often means being reined in when it comes to your creativity – you’ll likely be working with corporate clients who have a very clear idea of what they want, and will expect you to stick to a specific corporate style.

I remember thinking ‘do you really want it to look like that?!’ when I got my first design brief – but being in a junior role, I learned quickly that people didn’t really care about what I was capable of as a designer, what they did expect of me was to understand their vision, and use my knowledge to bring it to life.

Internships can be invaluable, though, in that you get to see how the design industry works from the inside. Having spent all of your education time learning about yourself as a designer, you get to learn about the business aspect.

Learning how a business is run

Leading on from that point, I found it surprising how little I knew about the actual inner workings of a design agency. Often, there is little scope or time to spend perfecting your designs. You’re working for a client, and they have deadlines to meet. You might find that you’re expected to ‘rush things through’ and make last minute changes, even if that means going against your instincts. I’ve had plenty of projects, even as an agency owner, where I’ve been really chuffed with a design, only to have the client come back and tell me it’s not what he wants.

Remember; most of the time, you’re working to realise the client’s vision, not your own – and that can be a tough lesson.

I suppose what I’m trying to get across here is that learning doesn’t end when you leave the classroom. Moving into an agency job can be exciting, exhilarating, and sometimes exhausting – but it’s an equally important step in the journey. In fact, it might just change your perspective on which path you decide to take. It can serve to get you ‘in the door’ of an agency you really aspire to work for, or it can give you the tools to make your own way.

There are plenty of different paths you can choose to get where you want to be – internship is just one of them. Don’t be afraid to evolve. Creativity can take so many forms, and ideas can change – that’s a good thing.

Design Community / Education / Experience / Graduates / Graphic Design

What can designers do to help graduates?

Something happened recently that brought back a few memories for me and altered my perspective a little bit. It wasn’t anything that seemed ground-breaking, but it did really help someone, and gave me a little insight into the relationship between us as designers and those who are just at the start of their careers.

Every now and then, as I suppose many graphic design professionals do, I get emails from graduates or those wanting to pursue a career in design. What they’re looking for is often guidance by way of an internship or advice on where they can go for help in starting their chosen career.

I got one of those emails last week. This particular graduate was looking for someone to mentor her; an internship – which as a small agency, isn’t something I can offer, but I can remember those early days when all you needed was someone to give you that one small chance to get you on the right path. It can be tough. You don’t yet know what it’s like to work as a designer in the real world. You haven’t got the experience to know which direction you should, or want to take.

This young aspiring graphic designer was looking for her path. She didn’t have a lot of experience out of the classroom. She had a modest portfolio online, with which she was beginning to market her skills to gain an internship, where she was hoping to continue her learning and get a foot in the door. The work she’d done was well executed. She’d developed her own style which shone through in the pieces she presented. She obviously had a real passion and flair for design – she just needed an opportunity to use what she’d learned in the real world.

I responded to her email, although I wasn’t sure I could help her – I let her know that although I wasn’t in a position to offer her an internship, I liked her portfolio, and I urged her not to give up. I sent her a few links which I thought might help her in her search. It was a short message. But what surprised me was her reaction to it.

You see, despite sending emails to several design agencies, I was the only one who replied. She was elated that I’d taken the time, not only to let her know I couldn’t help with her request but had also offered her even a few little nuggets of encouragement and advice.

Our short email correspondence made me realise that my response was rare. But why should this be? Have we forgotten what it’s like to be there? Are we really so busy that we can’t take a moment out of our day to help those at the start of their design career? Or is it that we feel that because we had to work through it and find our own way, unsupported, that all graduates should do the same?

Whatever the reason, I strongly disagree. We need exceptional designers. We need a diverse pool of talent to feed the ever-evolving landscape and changes in technology. Design changes so rapidly, and we need to keep standards high, and that means we need a constant supply of fresh blood in our industry.

And that starts with giving what we can by way of help and advice to those who are beginning the journey. How can we do that?

Be approachable

Next time you get an email or a call from a young designer, respond. Even if it’s a ‘Sorry, I can’t help, but good luck in your journey’. Encourage them to look at your portfolio, and other admired designers’ websites for inspiration. Send them a couple of links to places they could go for information.

It takes less than 5 minutes to put together a quick message – and you’ll feel better for it.

Use your contacts

I’ve said before that the creative circle tends to be a pretty closed one – particularly the smaller, localised agencies. But that said, we all have a list of resources and other designers that we follow as a source of inspiration.

Perhaps you are signed up to their newsletters or are part of an online community together. If you can’t help out when a grad student approaches you, I bet you know of someone else who might. Be generous with your contacts, and don’t be afraid to share names and details of people you trust who might be able to offer guidance.

Tell them your story

Give them some insight into what you did when you were in their position. Where did you go for information? Who helped you along the way? Who inspired you? How did you decide which path you wanted to take? All of these little personal insights could help in their decision making.

A sense of community

I think that we all have a certain responsibility in shaping the way design evolves in the future. And maybe it starts with this – offering that little bit of encouragement and inspiration to those who follow. Let’s not be remembered for ‘that agency who didn’t respond’, but instead, ‘the agency who helped me see that I could make it.’ We all need a bit of that sometimes, don’t we?

Experience / Graduates / Graphic Design / Portfolio / Side Projects

How should you curate your design portfolio?

If you want to get work as a graphic designer, one of the first things you’ll want to consider is how to present your portfolio to show it in its best light and to attract the right kind of clients. When you’re first starting out, it can be pretty hard to decide which pieces of work to include, especially if you haven’t got very much to show.

But even after years of experience and many projects, it doesn’t really get any easier – you just end up with a different set of difficulties in deciding which projects are the right ones to include.

Head over heart

Most of us came to this profession because we have a love of design. More than that – it’s something that always been part of us. Maybe you’ve always seen things in a slightly different way to most people. Your eye naturally picks up on the beauty of objects that others see as mundane. The colours and composition of the things around you seem to stand out and make you feel…something.

So how on earth do you decide which pieces to omit from your portfolio? After all, when you look at some of your best pieces, you remember how you felt when you were creating them. You know every detail of it, the work you put in, the thought process, and the sense of pride you felt when you sent it to the client.

OK, so maybe I’m being a bit melodramatic with this – but I think most of you will see some truth in it.

And the question remains – how do you choose?

Start by thinking about your past projects and your past clients. Which ones stand out as being the most enjoyable? Which clients did you find easy to work with? Which ones shared your ethos and saw your designs in the same way that you did? Those are likely the kind of clients you want to look for again, right?

You’ll also want to consider other factors, like your skills and abilities.

This is particularly important if you want to focus on a specific type of design. For example, you might be looking to gain more work in web design, if that’s the type of work you enjoy most. In this case, you don’t want to fill your portfolio with logo and branding stuff. And likewise, if you want to be known as a brand designer, by all means, put some website design in your portfolio, but make sure you add a variety of logo and branding projects as well, so they can see a breadth of skills. The aim is to tell a story of what you can do in order to give your ideal client whatever it is they’re looking for.

Have the confidence to only show your best work and not everything for everyone.

Thoughts about presentation and what information to include

Every designer has their own unique process and their own story. When you create your portfolio, you mustn’t neglect this – your images alone won’t sell. Your potential clients don’t just want to see what you do; they want to know how you do it.

So if you’ve worked on a great logo, rather than placing an image with a caption something like, “I was asked to do a logo, here’s what I did”, tell them the whole story. What was the client looking to achieve? What did you talk about to get the ideas flowing? Talk about their background/where they were starting from and the processes and techniques you used to get them the desired results.

People love stories – tell them yours. Give them an insight into your mind, how you work, and let them imagine what it will be like for them to work with you. What can they expect if they need something similar from you?

Side projects

There are some situations where you can use personal projects in your portfolio – and if you can, I’d encourage you to do it because it can really work in your favour.

You might be in a place where you have recently started out on your own, and you don’t have a whole lot of stuff to put into a portfolio. So what are your options?

Completing side projects can work well in demonstrating your will to take the initiative and allows you to experiment in ways you might not be able to under the constraints of a client project. Having the freedom to create projects of your own can be a great jumping-off point because you get to choose the kind of projects you do, and you can absolutely design the type of things you want to be doing through client projects in the future.

Article / Collaboration / Design Community / Graphic Design

Working with or working for?

Do designers need other designers?

I live in a relatively small town – there’s a lot of history here, and there’s also a large-ish college, which means that there’s a good mix of people, and a growing creative community. I think I’ve talked a bit about his before, but where I live and work is, from a designer’s point of view, a bit odd.

There are a number of graphic design and marketing agencies in and around my town, but they’re all quite hidden from view. You really have to seek some of them out – if you don’t know about them, you probably wouldn’t stumble across them.

I think that designers as a collective can be a pretty guarded bunch. When you work outside of the big cities there seems to be an air of suspicion, whereby other designers are seen as competition rather than part of a more extensive network.

But in thinking this, are we losing out on opportunities to foster growth and create a helpful, creative network? Rather than having that fear that other creatives are lying in wait to poach our clients, maybe we should think instead of teaming up and collaborating to offer something more significant than we can currently provide; a way to stretch our creativity and learn from each other.

Creating as a collective

If you ask a bunch of designers – or creatives for that matter – what they do, you will get a different answer from every single one of them. No two designers are the same; we all have our own style, specialism, and niche.
Of those tucked away agencies around my town alone, I bet they all have something very different to offer.

Having more than one style or skill come together can make for a much richer result, and open fresh avenues for designers. It’s not about stealing work from each other – it’s about working together to create something completely different.

There’s always going to be one person who takes ownership for a project – perhaps because they came up with the concept or something that is for their client – but collaboration is the difference between working with and working for. You can sub-contract out elements of the project, or you can choose to work together in a partnership where everyone is on an equal footing to get the job done – I know which I’d prefer.

Can collaboration make us better designers?

I think that no matter what type of creative work you do, there’s always something new to learn. There are so many different ideas, techniques, tools… having the opportunity to share some of that with other creatives can make you see things differently and get you out of a design rut.

It’s easy to trap ourselves into certain thought-patterns, whereby we get caught up doing the same things over and over, becoming too comfortable to break out of our comfort zones. If that happens, we tend to lose confidence, and then spend our time convinced that our designs have to be perfect before we can let anyone else see it.

But design isn’t about perfectionism – it’s about creativity. If we get stuck in a loop of getting everything perfect, doesn’t that mean that creativity is shoved to one side?

Being with other designers is a good way to break that cycle – rather than being there to criticise your work, they can lend a fresh eye to it, and having those conversations can spark new ideas, and get you moving forward again.

Work culture

Aside from actually collaborating, keeping in touch with other designers be valuable. We make connections with who we can lean on for advice and have other like-minded people on hand to talk things through.

This is particularly true if you are a small agency or work alone – as you can feel quite isolated, especially in these times where many of us are unable to work in our usual settings.

Having that extra ‘back up’ can go a long way in giving you that feeling of being part of something bigger than yourself.

Article / Experience / Graduates / Graphic Design / Self Publishing / Side Projects

Favours for favours?

As part of the design community, the question of working for free often comes up. I think in most genres of the creative industry, there’s almost an expectation that we should be expected to take on projects for free, or under the guise of ‘exposure’, with varying opinions.

For designers who are right at the start of their careers, or who have a limited portfolio to show to prospects, it can be a difficult hurdle to overcome – after all, how can you get people to hire you if they can’t see what you’re capable of?

I feel there are 2 parts to this discussion – the first in being asked by prospects to ‘work for free’ (sometimes cleverly disguised as ‘exposure work’), the second is creating your own projects in order to showcase your work. The second one can be beneficial, the first one almost never is, so we’ll talk about this one first.

Asking for work

It’s likely that even if you’ve been in the game a while, there will be times as a designer when you have a need to prospect for new projects. It’s these ‘cold contacts’ that are most likely to be the businesses who; a) have little knowledge about how outsourcing works, and b) think that by asking for ‘freebies’ as a way of gauging your talent is the proper way to do things.

An inexperienced designer might be tempted to oblige. After all, it might lead to more paid work and it adds valuable content to your portfolio, right?

But hang on – let’s put this in perspective.

Let’s pretend for a minute that you’ve had 2 prospect responses. They both want to hire you, but one of them asks for a quote, while the other one asks if you can do the first element of the project for free ‘to see how it goes’.

Here’s where the ‘what if’ scenarios start to come into your mind. What if the guy who asked for the quote thinks you’re too expensive and decides not to hire you? What if the ‘free’ project is the one that will ultimately lead to the most lucrative work?

I can reassure you here that the first scenario is always the least dangerous. Because if your quote gets returned with concerns over the budget, there are always things you can do – like offer to complete elements of the work in order to meet their budget or payment instalment plans for example.

But the ‘freebie’ guy? Sure, he might hire you down the line for your usual rate – but I’m willing to bet that he’ll haggle and argue at every turn. And if you take on that project for free, which might take you several hours, then you are making yourself unavailable for proper, paid work.

How to respond if you’re asked to work for free

This can be tricky, particularly if you’re desperate for work. That temptation to grab every opportunity for fear of missing out can be strong. But in order to avoid devaluing your abilities, it’s important that you learn to stand your ground – and I’m saying that from a place of experience. By accepting free work, you’re not only doing a disservice to yourself, but you’re also giving the message that design as a profession holds no value.

So what can you say when a prospect utters those words, ‘can you do the first project for free/for exposure/as a test-run?’.

There are a few ways you could choose to handle it – as long as you remember that the answer should always be ‘No’.

The first thing you should do is to take a step back. Don’t rush in with your response from a place of emotion. The prospect isn’t doing this out of spite or malice – they are simply unaware of how the design process works. It’s your job to educate them.

Perhaps this is a prospect that you really DO want to work with. It could be that you’ve followed them for a while, and they’re just the kind of business you want to design for. If that’s the case, then consider responding with a polite note, advising them that although you are not in a position to offer free work, you can point them in the direction of other work you’ve done for similar industries. If you don’t have any examples, then perhaps you can seek out other projects you can do (for pay, of course!) so that you can approach them again in a few months’ time.

Or you can politely decline. Again, let them know that as a creative professional, you are not able to complete the project for free, but perhaps they can consider you again when they are in a position to hire you for your usual fee.

When it’s ok to work for free

What I am a great advocate for is self-initiated projects. I believe these types of projects can be a brilliant way of creating your own portfolio pieces, on your own terms. Whether you are an experienced designer or not, periodically taking time to work on your own projects allows you to explore different techniques and design methods which you might not get the opportunity for with client work.

The benefits are two-fold; you get that extra bit of creative freedom, and you get to escape that rut of always taking on the same type of client project. It gives you the chance to push the boundaries a little bit and inspires you to take different avenues.

I’ve done this myself a few times – with my self-published book ‘Ten Yrs Later’, and for some localised projects such as the creative festival I began working on during 2020. Both of these have worked for me in both a professional and personal scope because it gives me something else to showcase what I can do, and lets me ‘play’ and explore outside of my usual workload.

If you are at the start of your career or feel the need to change your niche, taking a bit of time out to create different pieces for your portfolio is the best way to do it. It can be as simple as choosing an existing or imaginary brand and redesigning it using your own style and techniques.

I hope this article gives you the confidence to realise your own value in what you do. Design, in whatever form it takes, is a valuable asset to your clients and should be treated as such.

Article / Design Community / Graphic Design / Inspiration / Press Release

Creativepool: Best Graphic Designers of 2020

Written by Antonino Lupo
Published 17/12/2020

10 of the most exciting and talented graphic designers to keep an eye on in 2021

Good graphic design is easy to spot. But excellent graphic design? You need to have a specific kind of eye, taste and interest to understand what that is all about. The best graphic designers of this year all embody that spirit – a quirky, creative will to do things differently, to excel in simplicity and amaze with the pure power of shape, colour and text.

Read the full article at creativepool.com

Article / Branding / Graphic Design / Inspiration / Project Highlight

Three years of design

Unbelievably, Severn is three years old already. We’ve come a long way over that time; there have been a lot of highlights, and a few near-misses to learn from.

So I’d like to talk a little bit about what got us here, and share some of the most noteworthy projects that we’ve had the pleasure of being involved in over the past few years.

The reason why a made the decision to start an agency, rather than to freelance, was because of the way I wanted my business to grow. I wanted to be seen as part of something bigger, and having an agency felt a bit more substantial, and had a certain stamp of trust about it.

I feel fortunate that I made that decision, because it’s opened the doors to so many great design projects, and given me the freedom to experiment with plenty of techniques and processes, and allowed me to work alongside many different industries.

I’d like to share a few of my favourite projects and highlights, and some of the projects that are happening right now.

My highlight project

Perhaps it’s unfair to say this is my favourite project over the last three years; there have been many that I still look back on with a sense of achievement. But saying that, the work that I did for the local business, Glouglou, is one that sticks in my mind. Possibly because I had involvement in the branding of the business from its infancy, and the owners were so great to work with.

You can read more about what I did for them in an earlier post, but in summary, their approach to the brand was unique, and I think we managed to come up with something that completely encapsulates what they are all about. I can’t think of another brand that looks like they do in their branding, and everything they do, both online and offline, ties in with their image perfectly.

Personal highlights

From setting up the business, and then working towards my MA, I’ve been able to explore so many opportunities I might not have thought possible before. Like creating my own book, Ten Yrs Later, which showcases my design thinking and tells my story through my work.

I also won the Creative Conscience Award, which was fantastic to work on and a huge confidence boost. Designing the app allowed me to try out new techniques and be involved in subjects I hadn’t previously had too much experience in – Mental Health, and the Emergency Services.

It’s not something that many people think about, but there is huge pressure on people who work on the front line, and taking care of their mental health is often overlooked, and frequently stigmatised. So being able to look at ways I could help them, as a designer, was an eye-opening and valuable experience.

And an upcoming highlight – I’ve recently been asked to get involved in the Coventry Design Festival (although that one isn’t happening until 2022).

What’s happening right now?

There are a couple of local projects going on that I’m part of, and both are centred around Shrewsbury.

The first one – Market Hall: A Day in the Life – is focussed on Shrewsbury Market Hall, and tells the story of the building’s history, and the people who work there. The building has always been a big influence within the town, and it’s great to keep it alive by telling the stories of the current stall-holders, and giving a history of its architecture and use over the years, in relation to the town. 

Another ongoing project – Public Opinion – where we created an online survey, did face-to-face interviews and asked on social media, where the local public could share, anonymously, their opinions on the town of Shrewsbury.

We used this information to share some of the comments, using stickers around the town, sharing a booklet, and projecting them on slides from the studio.

Did lockdown affect us?

I was affected very personally by Covid – my family and I caught it about 2 weeks before Lockdown 1.0. What hit me most was how utterly exhausted it made us feel. And then of course businesses began to shut down, and I was left in a situation where for the first time in a long time, I had to seek out work, because everyone was putting their marketing on pause, meaning my workload reduced significantly.

The second lockdown has felt different – in general, more businesses are staying open where they can, and those who are working from home are more confident in booking meetings vis Zoom, so even if budgets are reduced, they are thinking about how they can remain in front of their customers, which means keeping ahead with web design and graphics.

The future

I think for all businesses, the future looks different to how we thought it would back at the beginning of the year. We’ve all had to adjust, and I’m no exception.

Views have changed, and for me, it’s forced me to focus on things in a different way.

I’m keen to continue to evolve in a professional capacity and challenge myself a bit more. I’m really enjoying working with local causes, and I count myself lucky to be in this part of the world.

Graphic Design / Print

Print is definitely not dead

Promoting your business offline

Pre-internet, promotion looked very different. We relied on using print to show off our best work. We used to send out portfolios so that prospects could see our work in print-form. It’s all very well having a beautifully designed online portfolio, but you can’t hold it in your hands. You can’t smell the brand-new paper and ink. You can’t touch it.

That’s where the idea for my book, Ten Yrs Ltr came from – I wanted to get back to that, by creating a showcase of my best work. It’s a bit different, and it gives people a sense of nostalgia, making it a memorable experience.

There are other agencies who do this particularly well – the ones that stand out for me are both by DixonBaxi; Be Brave, which includes case studies of their work, and Monograph, a beautifully illustrated showcase of their most recent work highlighting the processes and thought behind each one.

Be Brave, DixonBaxi. The book captures the spirit of how [they] partner with clients to solve significant brand challenges through creativity.
Monograph, DixonBaxi. The self-published 300-page monograph is a snapshot in time of one of London’s leading brand agencies.

It doesn’t have to be as complicated as a book. Something I like to do is present my prospects with a selection of my work as printed material – it helps me to stand out, because rather than turning up to a meeting with a slideshow on a laptop, I’m letting them see what my work looks and feels like as a real document.

I think people appreciate it when you’ve gone to the effort of presenting yourself in this way, and also making it personal to them. It shows that you understand their requirements, and that you’re knowledgeable about how design can work for them specifically. It makes them remember you.

In today’s world, we are so focussed on the online way of doing things, we’ve lost sight of the enormous possibilities that print promotion holds. Sure, we rely on online marketing, but perhaps having print promotion to accompany that should be something we consider more.

Keep it simple

How many of us have business cards anymore? You might believe they’re irrelevant in today’s world, but I’d disagree.

Far from just a piece of card with your number on it, a business card can be used to really show people your design capabilities. By playing with the design of your business card, you can make it something different and memorable – there are so many options here, from the kind of material you use, the shape (it really doesn’t have to be a rectangle), use of embossing or metallics, and making good use of both sides of the card.

It’s in the Mail

People love getting stuff in the mail. It’s something we’ve lost in the digital age, but I think it still has relevance. A while ago, I came across a little stack of letters I’d written to try and get an agency job. They were in envelopes, along with my (20-year-old) CV. I decided to make something of them, so I sent them out with a covering letter to the original recipients. It was a bit of a gimmick, but I got a nice response from it – including this reply from one of the partners at Pentagram:

“Your 1998 CV ended up on my desk. Really liked the paper and feel – you just don’t get these sort of CVs anymore – funny though what might have been.

“I looked at your site – would love to see your book – I couldn’t see how to buy a copy?”

By sending that letter, I prompted a written response, but also moved the recipient to go and look at my website, and gave him the desire to purchase a copy of my book. Would I have got the same response if I’d sent an email? Almost certainly not. (and it’s since available to buy…)

Creative bubble

I think perhaps it’s easy to get lost in the sheer vastness of the online world. And yes, I agree that most of us need to have a strong online presence, because that’s where our customers are. But it is increasingly an overcrowded place. So perhaps we can get the edge by looking at creating more offline content, too.

Feel free to contact us for a no-obligation chat, if you’re looking at new ways to promote your business. We can bounce some ideas around, and see what we can come up with…

Detail: My 20-year-old Ozalid-printed CV. You can still, just about, smell the presence of ammonia.
© SEVERN AGENCY LTD